Posted by: Michael Ritter PhD | June 5, 2009

USGS Hurricane Season Resource

Upper left - Category-4 Hurricane Katrina moving towards the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama on August 28, 2005. (photo credit: NASA Terra Satellite) Lower left - The eye of Hurricane Ike as seen from the International Space Station on September 4, 2008. (photo credit: NASA) Upper right - Debris pile in Galveston, TX caused by Hirricane Ike. (photo credit: FEMA) Middle right - Lines of cars leaving Beaumont, TX before the arrival of Hurricane Gustav. (photo credit: FEMA) Lower right - New Orleans, LA, flooding from Hurricane Katrina. (photo credit: USGS)

Upper left - Category-4 Hurricane Katrina moving towards the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama on August 28, 2005. (photo credit: NASA Terra Satellite) Lower left - The eye of Hurricane Ike as seen from the International Space Station on September 4, 2008. (photo credit: NASA) Upper right - Debris pile in Galveston, TX caused by Hirricane Ike. (photo credit: FEMA) Middle right - Lines of cars leaving Beaumont, TX before the arrival of Hurricane Gustav. (photo credit: FEMA) Lower right - New Orleans, LA, flooding from Hurricane Katrina. (photo credit: USGS)

June 1st was the start of the Atlantic hurricane season and it appears that this year with be a fairly normal one according to the National Hurricane Center . Though NOAA is probably the first place many people turn to for hurricane information, the USGS also has plenty of useful resources.

Browse to the USGS Science: Before, During , and After the Storm for  “a “one-stop” USGS hurricane Web site where the public can access important storm information such as flood levels near your home; pictures of the coastline before and after the storm; information on the timing, extent and magnitude of storm tide; and much more.”

The Physical Environment textbook links: Hurricanes.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: